DAA Daily

Smart headbands claim to make you calmer, but do they actually work?

By Aryaman Bhatia Science and Tech Editor, The Pawprint

The 24-year-old Illinois native is a member of USA Bobsled/development Skeleton’s team. She is an all-around athlete who is also a certified weightlifting instructor and recently completed a master’s degree in exercise physiology. Her new headband is a neurofeedback or EEG (electroencephalogram) gadget. They monitor the wearer’s brainwaves and are becoming increasingly popular among athletes. 

Because a stressed brain emits more waves or signals as a result of increased electrical activity, the idea is that the headbands, in conjunction with meditation, can help the user teach himself or herself to be calmer. As a result, their performance will improve. 

As a result, she contacted BrainCo, a company located in Massachusetts. They offered her to become a part-time, but compensated, researcher for a few months in 2020, based on her relevant university studies and engagement in weightlifting and winter sports. and once more early this year.

According to Derek Luke, InteraXon’s CEO, its clients are either “trying to solve a problem in their lives,” such as stress and anxiety, or “proactively attempting to better” at something, such as their performance in a certain sport.

 Mr Newlon claims that, similar to how physical training strengthens the body, people can learn to relax their minds, and that once learned, the skill persists. According to her, headbands inspire people to strive towards “norms” for an average brain. “This can leave some individuals feeling over or under stimulated after taking them,” she says, “possibly because their brains don’t exactly suit the ‘typical’ brain.”

Ms Baumert is now sure that the gadget is functional. “I had to visualize and learn how to have greater control, as well as what training I needed to do to get into a more relaxed condition while still having extremely high explosive power output.” According to BrainCo’s president, Max Newlon, the headband employs an AI (artificial intelligence) software program to monitor 1,250 “data points” in a person’s brainwave signal. 

It captures heart rate, breathing rate, and a person’s posture in addition to monitoring brainwaves. It also has an app that plays relaxing noises, such as those from a rainforest. According to Derek Luke, InteraXon’s CEO, its clients are either “trying to solve a problem in their lives,” such as stress and anxiety, or “proactively attempting to better” at something, such as their performance in a certain sport. 

This all sounds wonderful, but Dr Naomi Murphy, a clinical and forensic psychologist in the United Kingdom, is skeptical about consumer EEG equipment.

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